48 hours on the labour ward

I am a walking life support machine. For the moment, this is my only and most important function. It’s a really big responsibility, and, on Tuesday of last week, it looked like I might be breaking down. The diagnosis at 22 weeks of placenta praevia (PP) meant that any spotting whatsoever had to be taken very, very seriously indeed. The issue with PP is that, if you get a bleed, it is usually a precursor to future, more significant and serious bleeds. These are caused by weakening or tears in the placenta, which, if they become worse, can cause it to stop functioning. To manage the risk to both mother and baby in the case of increasingly catastrophic bleed scenarios a decision is usually made, once a bleed gets to about a pints’ worth of loss, to perform an emergency c-section and put the baby in an incubator. The very grave warning to take my diagnosis of PP very seriously indeed was written all over my notes, but no spotting had manifested, and things seemed to be going very ‘normally’.

Until Tuesday of last week, when at 26.6 weeks, with a lack of pain that would almost have convinced me that I had experienced a failure of bladder, I found myself soaked in blood. I was asked for descriptions of how much several times on Tuesday evening, and the best I can do is to say that my underwear was soaked, but it didn’t hit the floor. This equates to about 30ml, apparently. Enough to raise all kinds of alarms.

I was at work, fortunately not teaching (it was the end of lunchtime), and I had gone out of my office to find a student from my tutor group whose birthday it was as I had bought a cupcake for him (a little tradition we have in our class), but had forgotten to give to him in tutor time. Not an especially strenuous activity. Having delivered the cake and birthday greetings, I felt that something was ‘not right’ and went to the toilet next to the school matron’s office. There, I found that I was soaked in blood. I had already given matron the number of the labour ward so that it would be on hand should anything happen such as this, given the PP diagnosis, and I asked her to call it, and an ambulance. I felt surreally calm; I had been warned that this might happen, and now it was happening, and so I had to deal with it. I phoned my husband. There is no way of not sounding alarmist when you tell your husband that, at just under 27 weeks pregnant, you have experienced a significant bleed and are awaiting ambulance transportation to hospital. The same can be said for telling your mother, too.

By the time I had spoken to the midwife at the 999 call centre about the details, the ambulance had arrived and the bleeding had subsided. It was a paramedic and car, rather than a full-blown ambulance, and my blood pressure etc. was taken. Having decided that I could be taken in the car, and after the laying down of an absorbent sheet on the passenger side, I was transferred to Stoke Mandeville labour ward. I was feeling, as usual, some discomfort under my ribs (totally unrelated muscular issue which I have been experiencing for a few weeks), and I kept reassuring the driver that the associated wincing and facial contortions were down to that, and that I was not going into labour in the car.

My husband arrived about 10 minutes after I did, and, from the look of him, was in a much worse state of shock than I was. I was seen and assessed quickly by a midwife who kept calling my husband ‘Dad’ which I could see he found confusing as its not yet a term of address that he has associated with himself. Having been poked and prodded by doctors, we were visited by a team of consultants, the most senior of whom informed me that ‘my maternity leave had just started’ and that I could ‘expect more and heavier bleeds’. I wasn’t going anywhere tonight.

I was installed on the labour ward and my husband dispatched to fetch the overnight bag which we really should have packed when we were given the original PP diagnosis. I was cannulated, given a fish and chip supper, a raspberry pudding and an incredibly painful steroid injection in the backside. My assessment of these developments; if you are in hospital and they cannulate you, you are not going anywhere. If they feed you, they are not anticipating operating on you immanently. If they give you a massive injection, it still has the potential to all get a bit serious. Steroid injections are given when there is a chance that a baby might need to be delivered early. These injections are given, 2, 24 hours apart, to assist with the development of the baby’s lungs in order that respiratory complications after birth are minimised. Better to have them and not need them than need them and not have them. They chuffin’ hurt, though.

Throughout these proceedings the baby was monitored and was active, healthy and apparently completely unbothered by the medical emergency in which is was involved. This was obviously very reassuring.

That night on the ward, I hardly slept and kept imagining that I would find myself covered in blood at any moment. That didn’t happen, though, and I was relieved to be fed again in the morning (so surgery still not immanent). I was told I would be scanned at lunchtime and my husband was going to return in time to accompany me to that. However, a slot became available at about 11am, so I went on my own. The news was good. The PP has resolved, the placenta iss now a good 2cm away from the cervix; a ‘safe’ distance. Even better, it showed no signs of damage or bleeding. In fact, where the bleed had come from was a mystery, with no obvious bleed site anywhere to be seen. The baby, meanwhile, continues to grow well, and seems active and healthy. In the absence of evidence of anything more sinister, the bleed has been attributed to a burst varicose vein. However, the sonographer noted that my cervix has become shortened (thankfully still closed), but this gives us something new to worry about. It seems that we have exchanged the PP diagnosis for the possibility of early labour. It’s less dramatic, but not the ‘normal’ prognosis that I was hoping for.

Back on the ward for a second night, I was fed again (yay!) and the cannula was removed. Red alert had officially been stood down. I still had to endure round two of the pain-tastic butt jabs, but, better done than not done. The consultant has said that the shortened cervix presents ‘no significant clinical concerns at this time’, and I have been released to laze about in my own bed. We have to go in and see another consultant on Tuesday afternoon to find out what the plan will be for the rest of this pregnancy – house rest, bed rest, carry on as normal etc. and I am, of course, on constant vigil for anything else untoward, which would require immediate return to hospital.

The only one who has been seemingly unaffected by all of this has been the baby, which, on Thursday morning gave myself and the duty midwife the proper run around (at 27 weeks, it still has plenty of room to change position) when they were trying to do its obs. It was being very uncooperative; it wouldn’t stay still and kept kicking the doppler probe. I had to literally chase it round my tummy with the machine for an hour and still we couldn’t get a good reading, although it was obvious to all that baby was alive and well in there. I guess that’s the price you pay for giving your baby steroids!

So now its just a case of waiting to see what happens next and hoping that its all normal and non-emergency in nature. Stay in there, baby, not too much longer to go!

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Pricks

Written 6th November, 2014.

I am a human pin cushion. I have 8 dot shaped bruises covering my thighs and tummy from the daily heparin, I’m having regular acupuncture, because it is relaxing to lay in a darkened room and not be able to move, and now I’ve had a ‘flu jab, too. The ‘flu jab was today’s unexpected bonus, following our second good scan at Stoke Mandeville’s EPU.

I was honestly driving myself crazy with worry about this scan. So much so that strange superstitious thoughts were starting to get more mental air time than is considered sane. For example, does seeing a single magpie and then another, second single magpie make that two for joy or double the sorrow? Oh dear.

I had a moment of dread while we were waiting to be seen that convinced me that history was repeating itself. The sonographer from mc1 still works there and I saw her arrive. She’s probably lovely, but to me she is the harbinger of doom. Get a grip.

No tears in the examination room today, and, once again, the team are lovely. But there is a technical hic of some kind which causes the sonographer to say to herself ‘oh no, lost it again,’ ‘Unfortunate turn of phrase,’ I said. I bet she felt bad. I didn’t mean for her to, but the comment wouldn’t stay in.

She was very nice, though, and found the heartbeat straight away and showed us. Milestone #2. We’re relieved, but by no means confident, we’ve been here before and still lost it. But its a step in the right direction.

The ‘flu jab was a bonus and the midwife who did it asked us if we planned to have our baby at this hospital. We just kind of looked at each other… Baby? It still doesn’t really occur to us that all this jabbing and scanning and waiting might actually result in an actual baby one day. It makes me sad that this has happened, but we are the victims of circumstance.

Two weeks before my next scan. If I count that in pricks, that’s 14 injections and many more acupuncture needles. What a way to carry on, but carry on we do, until something makes us stop.

The First Big Day

Written 30th October, 2014.

It’s fair to say that I am somewhat apprehensive about this morning’s hospital visit. This will be the fist scan for this pregnancy and, if it goes well (the scan and the cooperation from the prescription-giving powers that be), I will get my supply of heparin injections. Then I will have to inject myself daily, which is not particularly something that I’m looking forward to doing. But there are many bridges to cross on this quest before I get to that stage.

The weekend brought a little spotting, which was alarming, and I sent my husband out on Sunday morning to fetch a digital test (off he dutifully went to join the Whitby Goths on the walk of shame, looking for an open chemist). I was convinced that I had a) imagined the whole thing, or b) it was already over and the spotting was an ominous sign. The digi proved hopeful, however, showing that the numbers had going from 1-2 weeks to 2-3 weeks, over the time period of one week (amazing!).

The lovely RMC ladies on my regular Mumsnet forum were sending their support and advice, and many of them have had similar issues with spotting which they put down to the cyclogest, which can cause irritation (specifically, the way you take it – enough about that). Hopefully this was the cause. I also emailed Professor Brosens at Coventry who, wonderfully, emailed me back on a Sunday (!!) and told me spotting was reasonably common and to increase the cyclogest dosage from 200mg twice daily to 400mg at the same frequency.

So, today we are off to Local Services for our first scan. I don’t like this hospital. The people are nice enough, but they just don’t know what to do with me. They have protocols for MC, but I’ve been there, done that and got (several copies) of their bloody leaflet. I am taking my letters and paperwork, and if anyone there suggests that they will come blindly at me with a spoon (my description of how an ERPC is performed), I will be on the first train down to UCLH!

But let’s not be pessimistic. It could be OK. I was listening to my relaxation recording last night, and trying to visualise the happy outcome I want. The trouble is, I don’t know what that would look like. To me, the disconnect between being pregnant and actually having a bump, much less a baby, seems, if you’ll pardon the expression, inconceivable. A couple of people (pharmacists and such) have already congratulated me when I’ve been picking up my prescriptions and filling in forms. I tell them, thank you, but there’s a very long way to go yet. This is my 4th pregnancy, and I have nothing but an education in fertility and a pile of words to show for it.

Every time is different. Maybe this time is different… Dare I let the hope in?

Eight weeks of silence begins

I’m writing these posts now (beginning October 19th, 2014), but they won’t be published until much later. I’m doing it this way because, oddly enough, in spite of my grumping to the contrary, I have something that I do want to keep quiet for the moment.

I do, however, want to record the next 8 weeks’ journey, because it’s a scary one that doesn’t always get discussed much and it’s a really scary one for the ladies and their partners who are on it.

Yesterday, I discovered that I am pregnant again for the 4th time. It was a bit of a surprise, to be honest. I had been advised that, since everything was taking so long, I needed a HSG procedure (where they inject liquid into your uterus and tubes and X-ray you to see if there are any blockages etc.). After much chasing of consultant’s poor secretary I had the appointment booked for next cycle. That way we wouldn’t waste an egg and could try again after the procedure. Then, on Friday, I had some spotting. Blasted period was two days early. That changed things. The procedure would now be right on my ovulation date. Another month wasted. Another month I wasn’t going to get any younger. I texted the nurse to see whether I could have an earlier appointment, and she’s going to find out for me on Monday morning. I now need to let her know that I no longer need the procedure at all.

What made me test on Saturday? The pain sleeping on my chest on Friday night, the fact that the spotting had stopped rather than developing into a full period flow. To give you an idea of how confident I was that it would be negative, I can tell you that I left it on the side in the bathroom and didn’t check it for half an hour. Given that the results are only really reliable for 10 minutes, I assumed that the faint line was an evaporation line. But it bothered me enough to buy a ClearBlue digital test later that morning. Which was positive. Decisively.

Alright, then. So far I have emailed every medical care-giver I’m currently connected with (which is a long list) to set the wheels in motion to get the early scans and prescriptions I need if I’m to stick to the Coventry plan of progesterone (straight away) and heparin injections (after the pregnancy is confirmed to be in the right place – heparin and an ectopic pregnancy would be very dangerous indeed) . I’m hoping it won’t be a battle. I’m hoping that this one will stick.

The difficult demographic

In the very small bits of time when I’m not feeling sorry for myself, I feel sorry for the medical practitioners that come in to contact with women like me. Recurrent miscarriers; professional, educated late 30 something women. We are used to Getting Stuff Done. We’re clever, organised and our memories are long. And thanks to the Internet, we can research, read and gain at least a basic understanding of journal papers and read peer reviewed, published research. This ought to make us more difficult to fob off, but somehow this seems not to be the case. What is happening instead is that these kinds of character traits are making it easier to piss us off when we get fobbed off.

Don’t get me wrong, we know we’re the subjects of a very little understood area of medicine. RMC, after all, has been seriously underfunded for a long time. This is the case, in my view, because it happens to women and you don’t die from it. But there is current, peer reviewed research going on, and its high time that all of the major centres of excellence got on the collaborative bus, put their egos away and started moving forward.

Trying a new procedure at a new clinic (after reading their research) is not the same as going down to the health food shop and loading up your basket with as many supplements as you can carry, because you read on line that they worked for someone’s sister’s cousin. But some top consultants think it is the same.

I’ve been told IVF won’t help me, and I understand my medical issues sufficiently to accept this and not spend my money going privately for that treatment. I have also read several published medical papers on NK cells and new research on the dynamic process of implantation, and I don’t think it’s b*llsh*t. So I’ve made informed choices about what I need and what is worth paying for. Yes, I have also heard anecdotal stories of success, too. But I’m not just getting recommendations on buying a fridge, so, although they’re helpful, I’ve looked at research with medical authority, too. I’m not a fool.

The Philosopher R.M. Hare, in response to the question of whether unfalsifiable beliefs were meaningful and rationally held posits the theory of Bliks. In this theory, he gives the example of a student at university who thinks that all of the professors are trying to kill him. Nothing will shake his belief in this. Even when the professors are kindly towards him, he thinks to himself, “Aha! They are trying to  lull me in to a false sense of security before they strike!” This Blik is clearly insane, especially because no amount of evidence will persuade him to consider changing his view.

I am concerned that there are a few Bliks mixed in with the egos at some RMC clinics. And who suffers? Women and their partners who are looking for help and answers. We’re intelligent enough to know the difference between medicine and ‘snake oil’. Treating us as if we’re not is extremely frustrating, and I’m sure that everyone in the RMC world, on both sides of the speculum would agree that feeling wound up isn’t (literally) going to get us anywhere.

A little collaboration would go a long way. Bury the rivalry, please.

Practical Matters – What Happens at St Mary’s and Coventry RMC Clinics?

This post is intended to help ladies (and their partners) get an idea of what to expect if you have been referred for testing at these hospitals. I’m writing for those who have miscarried for a third (or more) time, as you are now officially sufferers of Recurrent Miscarriage, or Repeated Pregnancy Loss. You are probably in a state of grief and disbelief that you have miscarried again, at the same time as being determined to find some answers. You may have a helpful and supportive GP; you may not. Even if they are supportive, you will probably need to chase things up a bit, because although there are a lot of brilliant things about the NHS, sadly admin isn’t always one of them. See this post for more information: https://justonemoretimeagain.wordpress.com/2014/07/04/full-time-administrative-assistant-required/

These are my experience of these two hospitals. Your experiences might be slightly different, but hopefully this will be helpful to you. If you are able to do so, get your local hospital (wherever you had your last ERPC, if you had one), to send away the tissue samples from that procedure, or any tissues you have been able to recover, for genetic testing. If you take them to the hospital yourself, DO NOT allow them to be stored in formaldehyde, as this will make genetic testing impossible. This advice is from Prof Lesley Regan’s 2001 book, which you may find helpful: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Miscarriage-What-every-Woman-needs/dp/0752837575/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1409471375&sr=1-3&keywords=lesley+regan

A note on genetic testing; you may be asked to sign a parental consent form. This may be upsetting, but it is necessary, so it is good to be prepared to be asked to do so. Results from these tests take about 6 weeks and the consultant will normally phone you to tell you the results and follow it up with a letter. This information is very useful in determining what has happened in your most recent loss, and what might be able to be done to help you carry a baby successfully to term in the future. The NHS offers this kind of testing after three miscarriages, although, if there is a reason to believe that there may be a genetic issue in your or your partner’s family (many people live perfectly normally with a balanced translocation of chromosomes: http://miscarriage.about.com/od/twoormoremiscarriages/p/balancedtranslo.htm), then you might be able to get these tests earlier. Some hospitals will let you pay for these tests after 2 miscarriages, others will fob you off (I was told that they ‘didn’t have the right container’ after my second miscarriage, queue hysterical woman in backless gown – I always regretted not fighting harder for that one). You may be able to get your local services to order karyotyping for you and your partner, which will establish whether either of you have a balanced translocation that you may be passing on. Again, the results take about 6 weeks. All of this information will be very useful in determining your treatment plan for your 4th ‘try’, and your RMC clinic will want to take it in to account.

I was seen at St Mary’s last year (October 2013) and for the first appointment you will be scanned, medical history taken and lots of blood drawn. These are for clotting, thyroid and antiphospholipid antibodies.  You will need to go for a hot chocolate or something afterwards. You may wish to take your old notes and paper work copies with you if you have them, they may take some copies for your file. You may be invited to sign up for the TABLET test which is a study involving thyroid antibodies. Many of us donated a sample but were not used for the trial because we didn’t fit the criteria, but you might be, if you wanted to sign up.

If you need anything doing (hysteroscopy etc.) they’ll book that in. I had a septum removed, which was fine, like an ERPC with two coils and HRT for a month afterwards. It was a day procedure and not very painful. Things to consider for St Mary’s; they don’t allow partners on the ward, so you will be admitted and put in bed for the day and your partner sent away at 07:30 am and asked to come back at about 15:00 (they’ll call him). This is unlike other hospitals where you can wait together until it’s your turn. Take a good book. At St Mary’s, they also try to fit in as many operations as possible, which can mean that there is a long wait if someone’s procedure takes longer than expected. When I was there, someone was sent home and given a new date for surgery. This was obviously very upsetting for them. I think this is rare, however, and was caused by an earlier surgery of the day being more complicated than anticipated. It happens.

You might have a non-surgical procedure, or just the blood tests, so please don’t be worried that you’ll necessarily end up in theatre!

You’ll go back for repeat blood tests 6 weeks or so after the first lot and then have an appointment to give you all your results about a month after that. They’ll tell you what your treatment/plan will be and then you ‘go forth and multiply’ and call them when you’re pregnant again so they can do the TEG blood test again and decide whether you need anything for that, too, in a pregnant state, as it can change that result.

Many ladies have also been up for private NK (natural killer) cell testing with Profs Brosens and Quenby at Coventry. This costs £360 and you need to have had 2 periods before you go. They take a uterine biopsy and then advise what to do when trying again. Some people have told me that the biopsy doesn’t hurt. I found it quite uncomfortable both during and afterwards, but nothing that paracetamol won’t deal with. They usually recommend 200mg progesterone from CD21 to CD28, carrying on if you get pregnant, and then Heparin from ‘in uterine’ scan. If you have high NK cells, you may also be offered steroids, but other ladies will know more about that. I do know of at least two success stories from ladies who have been to this clinic.

The results of the biopsy take about 5 weeks and they will email you with the outline results and a time to call for your consultation. After that, you’ll be emailed a letter detailing your treatment plan. If the protocol doesn’t work within three months (as happened with me), they may suggest not using the progesterone until you get a positive pregnancy test.

You will need to not be pregnant for these procedures and tests, and hopefully the break from trying to conceive will help you to get your head around everything and heal emotionally.

I hope this helps some ladies (and their partners) to understand what tests they can expect at these clinics. Remember, 50% of couples never get a clear answer as to why this has happened to them. As distressing as this is (because we want answers), it’s actually good news, because it means that you have a very good chance of being successful without intervention in the future.

Emergency bathroom midwifery ***Birth described***

I have written before about how difficult I have sometimes found it to be around pregnant women and babies. Emotions swing between jealousy, self-hatred (I never used to be such a nasty b*tch) and sadness for what I’ve lost. Self preservation has a lot to do with it, I’m sure. That and the abject humiliation of having to leave a 2 year old’s birthday party because you can’t stop crying (got the t-shirt).

The reality is that you’re going to have to face pregnant women (and all their worries and complaints about their aches and pains) at some point; whether at work or out and about, they’re everywhere (are they breeding?!). You can either get on with it, or let in ruin your day. I’ve opted for a nice balance of both.

I knew that my sister and her husband wanted a second child, and I knew that they were tying (the loaned What to Expect books had made the return journey from my shelf to her’s). When she told me that she was pregnant again, I was pleased, but also envious (and guilty because of feeling the envy). I wouldn’t be able to avoid her for 7 months, and I wouldn’t want to have to try; I love my family, and there’s no way I’d want to make things difficult or awkward. You’d have to ask them if I’ve managed it!

It was very exciting when I fell pregnant again myself a couple of months later, and we discussed the baby things we could share (I believed at that point that I would be facing something of a financial crisis due to being in the middle of moving jobs and there being big question marks over my maternity pay entitlement). I had a few scares with bleeding etc. and I am sure that my sister’s heart was in her mouth every time I went for a reassurance scan, being pregnant and emotional as she undoubtedly was. She was having the most dreadful morning (all the time) sickness and had a demanding toddler already, so was exhausted. Everyone was tired and emotional, all the time.

Then I found out that my baby had died at the 13 week scan.

Awkward!

No need for hand-me-downs anymore. And yet, I could not have predicted then that the sisterly bonding over babies I had imagined would be more powerful and visceral than any amount of hand-me-downs and baby talk could ever have facilitated.

Three months after my third miscarriage and two weeks before my sisters due date, she texted me to say that her waters had broken. Her first had taken several days to put in an appearance, so no-one was rushing to get warm towels just yet. I decided to go over to her place and have a cup of tea while we waited for her husband to come home from work. No problem. My niece was with our parents, we could have a natter in peace.

When I arrived, everything was fine. The things for the overnight bag were laid on the bed, her notes were in a file by the ‘phone. I thought she seemed uncomfortable. I made her some beans on toast to keep her strength up for the task ahead. She couldn’t eat them. She said she was fine. I suggested she ring the midwife. The midwife said that, if we were worried, we should drive down to the hospital and her husband could meet us there. I have a very tiny little sports car, and was slightly concerned about my sister’s ability to get in to or out of it. “No, you can’t have an ambulance, it’s not appropriate,” came the midwife’s reply. Fair enough; if you don’t ask, you don’t get.

I packed the overnight bag and put it in the car. My sister went to use the loo. I heard her shout to me from upstairs that she couldn’t move. I know a contraction when I see it; by the time I got upstairs, she could hardly speak. In an act of desperation and futility, I brought her two paracetamol. She barfed them on to the bathmat. I fetched the overnight bag back into the house and phoned 999.

If you’ve ever had to make a call to the emergency services, you will know that they keep the coolest heads in the country. The operator talked to me calmly, but with extreme authority as I helped (forced) my sister on to the bathroom floor (she waned to stay on the loo – “absolutely not allowed,” said the operator. “Get her on to the floor. Now.”) Could I see the baby’s head? “I’m sorry, I’m going to have to look.” I’ll take that scream of agony as a ‘yes’, then, shall I? “No, I can’t see the head, yet.”

“Help’s on it’s way. Can you hear the sirens? Don’t worry. Help’s on it’s way.” I rubbed her back as she knelt on the floor. Contractions were about two minutes apart.

“Have you got clean towels?” said the operator. “They don’t think they’re going to make it,” I thought, but didn’t say.

No-one tells you this, so I’ll tell you now; if you have had to call an ambulance because you are having to deliver a baby at short notice at home, take a moment to go and open the front door. It’s a small, yet essential detail. I dashed downstairs to answer the banging at the front door. I have never been more relieved to see a paramedic in my life. My sister, by this stage, didn’t care. She’d gone primal. Her labour cries came from the earth itself. I texted my mum; “It’s happening. The ambulance is here. Don’t worry.”

The bathroom was too narrow for me to get to my sister to hold her hand, so I held her knee instead. All attempts to try to transfer her to hospital had now been abandoned. Nature was going to take its course; it was unstoppable.

My nephew was born less than 10 minutes after the ambulance arrived. It was extraordinary. My sister’s husband arrived about 15 minutes later, and did manage to find a space to stand, cradling his new-born son in the shower cubicle. Paramedics tended to my sister, one from in the gap between the toilet and the sink, another crouching in the bathtub. Midwives ran up and down the stairs. I made a few phone calls. Mum, dad and new baby were taken off to hospital in the ambulance. I followed on in the car, with the now overlooked overnight bag. “Don’t let that baby out of your sight,” texted my mum.

It wasn’t exactly the circumstances I would have imagined for my first visit to a maternity ward, but I had one job to do, and that was to look after my nephew. My sister needed surgery, and her husband went with her. I was left, alone, in a side room, literally holding the baby. A nurse made a comment that made it clear that she thought I was my sister’s mother. I’d had a stressful morning, but had it aged me that much?!

I spent the day sitting by my sister’s hospital bedside, getting snacks from the canteen and waiting for her belated epidural to wear off.

Was it better for me, and for her, that I have coped in so many crises before that I could keep a cool head in that one? I will say this; someone’s got a wicked sense of humour.

If you like, or feel you have been helped by what you have read here, please share it. If you want to see more, why not follow me? Thank you for reading!

Extra special thanks to my sister for agreeing to let me write about this.

 

 

Blood bath ***Caution. Contains graphic descriptions***

There is little more alarming that a spot of blood when you go to the loo, if you’re pregnant. Everybody knows that your periods are supposed to stop, and, although we probably all know someone who has had break through bleeding or spotting early on in their pregnancy, it doesn’t make it any less scary if it happens to you.

The start of my first pregnancy was characterised by several episodes of light spotting. This, although never accompanied by pain (which is the scariest sign of all), was worrying enough to result in two separate ambulance rides (once from work, once between hospitals), a day in a bed on Ward 4, several hours in A&E, three trips to the EPU (Early Pregnancy Unit) and more than one out of hours doctor’s appointment. Hysteria will get you a long way.

My second pregnancy was just as short as the first, but much less bleedy, lulling us both into a false sense of security that the outcome might be better. It wasn’t. So much for that theory.

But, for all of these minor episodes of spotting, nothing could have prepared me for what happened at the start of my third pregnancy. We had gone out for the evening and were in a local pub with friends. I was driving, so no need to fib about why I was off the sauce. I was faithfully taking my cyclogest (progesterone), and was (thankfully) wearing a pad, since that can be a rather ikky, messy business. Suddenly I felt what can only be described as a ‘gushing’ sensation. I excused myself and, upon reaching the ladies room, found that I was covered in bright red, fresh blood from the waist down. I cleaned myself up as best I could and asked a passing friend to fetch my husband. I felt strangely calm and detached. Oh well, here we go again. That’s that, then.

We stood staring down a toilet that looked like it had just played a starring role in a slashser movie, wondering whether to flush. We thought that our baby might be in there, somewhere, but there was just too much blood everywhere to tell. I knew that one of the best chances we had of finding out a cause would be to recover it and have it sent away for genetic testing, but, in the end, neither of us could do it. So we flushed.

If you have suffered a serious bleed during pregnancy, and miscarriage seems immanent, you are advised not to drive (in case you faint). My husband had already had a beer or two and I was the designated driver, but now I couldn’t safely drive, either. A friend kindly drove us the 20 minutes to the nearest A&E and dropped us off.

We waited.

And waited.

And waited.

9, 10, 11 o’clock, 12 o’clock rock.

Having arrived at 21:00, we were seen by the triage nurse maybe an hour later, and I was cannulated. My theory is that they do this so that you can’t escape if you get fed up of waiting the further three hours after you’ve been triaged. Targets met; everyone’s a winner! It was almost 2 am before we were seen by a Doctor, 4 by the time we were discharged.

The whole time we were there (sustaining ourselves on chocolate and fizzy drinks from the healthy choices vending machine, having ascertained that I didn’t need to be nil by mouth), at no point were we offered a scan. We were given an appointment at the EPU three days later. Point 2 of the Mumsnet Miscarriage Care Campaign (http://www.mumsnet.com/campaigns/5-things-that-need-to-change-in-miscarriage-care) states that scanning should be available. The reality is that if you present at A&E with bleeding in early pregnancy, there is a good chance you will be waiting several days to find out whether your baby is alive or dead. It is my strong belief that this fact puts appalling mental strain on women and their partners in a, frankly, oppressive ’12 weeks of silence’ (or is that isolation?) culture. More steam to vent on that one another time!

We got home at about 4:30 am, I emailed work to let them know I wouldn’t be in (and set my cover lessons! How’s that for dedication!), and we went to bed. No alarm clocks. We would deal with the morning in the morning.

Tuesday was spent watching day time TV and eating fish and chips. There was a program about cats on. It was nice. Invariably, when we’ve had pregnancy related issues, it’s felt like all that’s on TV is One Born Every Minute, or a character in a favourite show is getting a scan (Bones, Breaking Bad, Homeland, all had story lines featuring scans right after I’d MC’d). The scan was booked for Thursday. We decided to be proactive so we got up and went down to UCLH’s walk in EPU first thing on Wednesday morning and waited.

There, against all odds, we saw a tiny little flicker of a perfect heart beat; 6 weeks, 5 days.

I believe that we experienced the full range of emotions over the course of those three days. It’s not a roller coaster ride I’d care to repeat.

And I know it didn’t, ultimately, end well for baby number 3. But it wasn’t anything to do with what happened that night. In fact, we were told that the combination of progesterone and aspirin can lead to these kinds of sudden, heavy bleeds. As far as this part of the story goes, it may not have been a happy ending, but I’ll take a happy middling. It’s a close as we’ve got, so far.

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Another frustrating day…

This is an entry I posted on a particularly soul searching day back in March last year. I’m reposting it here because I’m closing my other blog down.

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One 30 something woman

A couple of weeks ago I went for an ultrasound scan. How very exciting! Sadly not. This was the 6 month check-up following a Summer of disasterous adventures in what happens when a miscarriage goes very badly wrong. Yes, it’s true. My second missed miscarriage in 6 months turned me from the 1 in 5 to the 1 in 100 and beyond as I exhausted the gynaecological expertise of an entire hospital.

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Losing my innocence

The statistics tell us that as many as 1 in 4 pregnancies will not succeed, but that knowledge doesn’t make it any easier if miscarriage should happen to you. What you do get is a crash course in the using the NHS (mostly good, occasionally strange, sometimes frustrating – the admin is frequently bonkers).

My story has been going on for almost three years, and it isn’t over yet. I want to tell it in the hope that a) I get it off my chest, and b) share what I have learned in the hope that someone, somewhere might find it useful. Maybe even inspirational. If you’ve found this blog because you’re going through miscarriage, I’m sorry for your loss, and I hope you find something of use here.

So, here’s the first installment.

In November 2011, after one (one!) attempt, I tested negative on a HPT the day before going on holiday. I went on holiday, and experienced a weird, rather spotty period. It didn’t seem to stop after a week, which was a bit odd, but it did eventually wear off, so I forgot about it. Then, a week later, I was playing in an indoor just for fun badminton league when I noticed I was feeling slightly nauseous. We were off out to a birthday party that night in a pub, and I was planning to drink, so I decided to do another HPT just in case. I wasn’t expecting it, but, guess what? It was POSITIVE.

I can’t tell you; I was in shock. My DH was in shock. We immediately drove to Sainsbury’s for a digital HPT which confirmed that I was 2-3 weeks pregnant. We went to the party. I drove. When they got the birthday cake out, I ran to the toilets and threw up. That was the last normal pregnancy related thing that happened to me.

If you like, or feel you have been helped by what you have read here, please share it. If you want to see more, why not follow me? Thank you for reading!